What You Need To Know About Colonoscopy (eBook)

This eBook outlines the risks involved with supposed routine colonoscopies. This is data that even your doctor is unlikely to know – yet all of it is from peer-reviewed medical publications. For those times when you simply must have a colonoscopy, I tell you how to protect your colon before the procedure and how to repair the damage afterwards.

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This eBook outlines the risks involved with supposed routine colonoscopies. This is data that even your doctor is unlikely to know – yet all of it is from peer-reviewed medical publications.

Jini Patel Thompson gives you practical guidelines to help you make a decision as to whether you really do need to have a colonoscopy done, or not. She also gives you detailed instructions on:

  • A gentler, natural form of colonoscopy test prep
  • What to do before a colonoscopy to protect your colon
  • What to do immediately after a colonoscopy to prevent infection and repair the damage
  • What to do for 6 months following to restore and build up your protective gut flora (good bacteria in your gut)

For example, did you know that:

“A common sterilant for colonoscopes (gluteraldehyde) has actually been proven to cause colitis. If you develop any of the following symptoms within 48 hours of having a colonoscopy, it’s likely the gluteraldehyde residues on the colonoscope are responsible: Cramps and abdominal pain, tenesmus (painful, urgent straining to defecate), rectal bleeding and in some cases, hemorrhaging.”(1)

and

“Human error also plays a big role in colonoscope contamination. One study observed staff responsible for cleaning colonoscopy apparatus for two years running – and their conclusion was: If the staff do not clean the colonoscope properly prior to disinfection, then no matter what sterilization procedure is in place, the colonoscope remains highly contaminated; and after two years of observation, they discovered a lot of evidence of human error.”(2)

Sources:

1. Glutaraldehyde colitis: radiologic findings, By Birnbaum BA, Gordon RB, Jacobs JE, Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Radiology 1995; 195:131-134

2. High-level disinfection or ”sterilization” of endoscopes? By Muscarella LF, Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 1996;Vol 17, Iss 3:183-187
and
Quality improvement in gastrointestinal endoscopy: Microbiologic surveillance of disinfection, By Merighi A, Contato E, et al., Gastrointest Endoscop 1996; Vol 43, Iss 5:457-462

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What You Need To Know About Colonoscopy Table Of Contents

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Also available on Amazon Kindle – $1.99